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News & Press


Here are some interviews, guest blogs, articles, and videos.

Nothing Up My Sleeve

Coco, A Story About Music, Shoes, and Family

UHV professor writes book adaptation for Disney
"This story has kind of an off-world setting, so I had to do some world building," Lopez said. "This is like writing fantasy with training wheels."
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Disney Chooses UHV Professor to Write Movie Novel Adaptation "'This was a dream project for me,' López said. 'When I watch movies, I'm always curious about the possibilities and expanded stories for different characters that viewers miss because of time limitations. But this gives me the opportunity to expand the story and give characters more development.'"
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Nothing Up My Sleeve

Nothing Up My Sleeve

Valley Morning Star: Reading Rock Stars Share Magic of Books with Young Valley Students
"Fifth grader Edgar Hurtado was ready to wow Texas Book Festival Reading Rock Stars author Diana López with his clever card trick during her March 2 visit to Carl Waitz Elementary School in Alton."
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Las Comadres: Diana López Speaks About Nothing Up My Sleeve
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Latinos in Kid Lit: Q&A with Author Diana López about Nothing Up My Sleeve
"Writers harvest ideas and voices from their environment, and that's exactly what I did. I even called my nephews when I was looking for creative insults like 'Fungus Foot, Toilet Clogger, Slobber Boy, and Stink Bomb.' Yup, they get total credit for that."
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Latinos in Kid Lit: Nothing Up My Sleeve by Diana López
"Another quality that I love about Diana López's books is their attention to character development, and Nothing Up My Sleeve doesn't disappoint. With magic as the backdrop, she conjures three well-rounded, realistic characters who face struggles and earn triumphs just like any real kid might."
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Ask My Mood Ring How I Feel

Ask My Mood Ring How I Feel

Las Comadres: Diana Lopez Speaks About Ask My Mood Ring How I Feel
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Kirkus: Serving a little hope and a few mood swings
"I don't know how they'd colored that dog such a vivid pink, but it was such a fun, celebratory image—that's the feeling I got when at the race, that despite the way cancer had touched families in serious and tragic ways, there could still be celebration."
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Mamiverse: Q&A with author Diana López
"I knew I had a book idea when I pictured a woman buying nine bikinis because she wanted to show off and enjoy her figure before having a mastectomy."
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Latinos in Kid Lit: Teaching Tips for Ask My Mood Ring How I Feel
"In a Social Studies and Language Arts classes, teachers can use the book as a launching point for their own students' service projects as well as a geographic study of San Antonio."
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Read to Write Stories: An Interview with Diana López
"I am always looking for opportunities to heighten the conflict. It's what drives a novel just as it drives a good conversation. Imagine how bored you are when your friend is relating the non-eventful details of her day, and then imagine how attentive you are when your friend is talking about someone in trouble. We love conflict."
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Choke

Choke

Victoria Advocate: UHV Professor's Book Becomes a Movie
Lopez's experience as a middle school teacher partially influenced Choke.
"These three girls came in, and they had bloodshot eyes," she remembered, "and I thought they were smoking pot."
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Psychology Today: The Choking Game is Not Just a Movie
"In terms of The Choking Game, social media unfortunately makes the choking seem cooler because it appears as if 'everyone is doing it.'"
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The New York Times: Fear and Self-Loathing
"Her decision to show all the girls' insecurities about 'proving' their friendship, and the parallels she draws between Windy's struggle to be popular and her father's bizarre makeover (dyed hair, blue contact lenses) after flubbing a job interview, provide ample fodder for young minds to mull. When tragedy strikes after a round of insistent squeezing, well, there's a lesson that shouldn't be dismissed."
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Austinist: Interview with Diana López
"It's hard to separate what you know now, from what you did not know then. It's hard to write in a way that does not sound like it's retrospective."
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LatinoMetro: Diana López: Literary Latina
"When writing Confetti Girl, I heard the voice, and for me, the toughest part of writing for any audience is finding the story's voice. I spend a lot of time searching for it, often taking long breaks away from a piece when I feel the voice isn't working."
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The Latino Author: Interview with Diana López
"My high school English teacher, Cindy Sullivan, made us keep two journals—a standard journal and a reader response one. I was very shy, so I didn't say much in class, but Ms. Sullivan and I had conversations via the journals. When I graduated, I had so much to discuss, but no one around me who could entertain what I was thinking. I called Ms. Sullivan, and she let me visit her, ramble on, for hours."
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Confetti Girl

Confetti Girl

Victoria Advocate: Diana López wins the William Allen White Award
"I think middle school is the most interesting time period in life," she said. "You are leaving behind childhood but not yet ready for adulthood. That leads to a lot of concerns and emotions that middle school students struggle to express. It can be difficult for them to articulate what's going on."
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Victoria Advocate: Inspiration for Crazy Socks
"They knew they had to wear white shirts and khaki pants, but there was nothing in the policy about socks, so the girls started getting these wild, wacky socks. And the boys, they were in to different kinds of shoe laces. So even though their shirts and their pants were the same, if you looked at their feet you could figure out what their style was."
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La Bloga: Interview with author Diana López
"I was brainstorming as I drove home from work one day, and that's when I saw one of my neighbors. She was in a rocking chair with cartons of eggs all around and a 'cascarones for sale' sign. There are people in San Antonio who save eggshells all year round, so they can sell cascarones during Easter and Fiesta. 'That's it!' I thought. 'Vanessa's house is full of cascarones!'"
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Beyond the Book: Confetti Girl by Diana López
"And throughout every stage of the process, I was always delighted with how much I loved this book in all of its manifestations. Diana's voice is so lovely and sweet, and as cliched as it sounds, this book truly made me laugh and cry."
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Cynsations: Interview with Diana López
"Very skinny, very shy, tomboyish, and clumsy. By the time I was in eighth grade, I had fractured seven bones for things like playing Tarzan and trying to be a Harlem Globetrotter."
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Odds and Ends

From Latinopia Word: Diana López reads "Quinceanunca: Never Fifteen"

American Book Review Reading Series: Diana López

American Microreviews & Interviews: Diana López of Huizache Magazine
"This is what inspired the title Huizache. It refers to a tree common in South Texas. It's a short tree with thorns, and it's considered a nuisance by farmers. Most people think it's ugly, so you don't really see huizaches in the nurseries, which only further proves how undesirable it is--so undesirable, in fact, that it gets pulled out like a weed. No matter. It's a stubborn tree. It comes back, and it blooms gold."
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La Bloga: On the Road With Book Smugglers
"The activists will return to Nuestra Palabra in Houston and study the lessons learned to find additional opportunties to bring banned books back to the children of Tucson's schools. That the action entailed humor and love stands for the world to see the protest as an act of love."
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